After a period of inactivity (or death) Google users can set up an Inactive Account Manager to delete incoming emails. Picture: AP

What happens to social media after you die

Nobody ever really dies in the 21st century because even when your physical body leaves the world, a digital legacy is left behind. When you die, it doesn’t necessarily mean your social media self dies too.

According to reports in 2016, around 8000 Facebook users die daily, the equivalent of 428 every hour.

In the first ten years of Facebook’s existence, 30 million users died — with 312,500 now reportedly passing away each month.

In fact, if the social networking giant stops growing, more users will be dead than alive by 2065.

So what happens to your Facebook, Instagram and Twitter accounts when you die?

About 30 million users have died in the last 10 years of Facebook’s existence. Picture: AP

About 30 million users have died in the last 10 years of Facebook’s existence. Picture: APSource:AP

Although Facebook has measures in place for dead profiles, according to The Sun, some massive social media sites will keep accounts active long after the user has died.

If a Twitter user dies, the company says it will work with a person authorised to act on the behalf of the estate — or a verified immediate family member — to have an account deactivated.

It is also possible to request the removal of a deceased user’s account, but they will require a copy of ID from the person making the request and a copy of the death certificate.

However, Twitter clearly states that it will not give access to a deceased user’s account regardless of his or hers relationship to the family member or friend requesting authorisation.

Twitter is only active or authorised while the account holder is alive and therefore best deleted after death. Picture: Supplied

Twitter is only active or authorised while the account holder is alive and therefore best deleted after death. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

When it comes to Facebook, the social networking site added a new setting last year that gives users the option of having their account permanently deleted when they die.

Otherwise users can choose a friend or family member to become a “legacy contact” and take control of some aspects of their account after their death. Facebook requires proof of death before this can be activated.

Legacy contacts can post a final message on the profile before it is turned into a memorial where friends can post messages of remembrance and sympathy.

Unsuitable content can be moderated by the legacy contact.

RELATED: What happens to your Facebook and Snapchat accounts after death?

To choose a legacy contact, users have to access settings and under the Security tab, and choose the “Legacy Contact” option that appears at the bottom.

Instagram accounts can be memorialised after death but cannot be changed or updated and no one else can log in to the deceased’s account. Picture: Getty Images

Instagram accounts can be memorialised after death but cannot be changed or updated and no one else can log in to the deceased’s account. Picture: Getty ImagesSource:Getty Images

Like Facebook, Instagram memorialises accounts, but they can’t be changed and no one can log into the profile.

Posts of the deceased user will stay shared on the site and are visible to the people they were shared with, but memorialised accounts do not appear in public spaces like searches.

Instagram asks that friends and relatives get in touch via email to notify them that a user has died. The picture-sharing app asks for proof of death.

Pinterest will not hand over log in details for a dead user, but it will deactivate their account if you send an email with a list of required information, including proof of the user’s death.

You must provide a copy of the user’s death certificate, an obituary or a link to a news article as proof for Pinterest to deactivate the deceased user’s account.

After a period of inactivity (or death) Google users can set up an Inactive Account Manager to delete incoming emails. Picture: AP

After a period of inactivity (or death) Google users can set up an Inactive Account Manager to delete incoming emails. Picture: APSource:AP

When it comes to emails, Google users can set up an “Inactive Account Manager” to delete their email account after a period of inactivity. Gmail will, however, allow a friend or relative to apply to obtain the contents of a deceased person’s email.

Yahoo will let relatives and friends delete an account if they have proof of death.

Users also have the option of setting an Inactive Account Manager, which either shares or delete your account after a set period of inactivity.

But Apple work slightly differently in that iCloud and iTunes accounts are “non transferable” — meaning that any rights to information terminate when a user dies.

What goes up, must come down. Picture: Alamy

‘It looks like an aluminium foil roll, you’ve drop and tried to wind back up’

They used to say it looked like a “giant dildo”, but now a controversial sculpture in Byron Bay has earned itself an even more inglorious nickname — “the giant dildo wrapped in barbed wire”.

In truth that’s just one of the hundreds of ingenious names which have been suggested by irate and sarcastic locals for a divisive 12 metre high landmark which sits slap bang on a newly opened .6 million roundabout.

Known to some as the “Disco Dong” or “Sea Side Shaft” for its glimmering, phallic majesty, taxpayer-funded 5,000 statement has whipped some residents — who have dubbed it an obscene waste of public money — into a fury.

Social media has gone wild over the sculpture. Picture: Facebook

Social media has gone wild over the sculpture. Picture: FacebookSource:Supplied

The installation is not yet complete. Picture: Facebook

The installation is not yet complete. Picture: FacebookSource:Supplied

An organised backlash from hundreds of concerned residents is brewing. They say the artwork is a “monumental cock-up” which is out of step with Byron Bay’s famed hippy beach vibe and ruins a formally scenic drive into the beachside community.

After somebody uploaded a new picture of the sculpture onto the Byron Bay Community Board Facebook group yesterday — proclaiming “it’s finished” — all hell broke loose.

Locals had once likened it to a “big silver dildo” when it was smooth, but now that strange metal protrusions seem to be emanating from it sides, the descriptions on social media have hit the next level.

“Now it looks like an aluminium foil roll, you’ve drop and tried to wind back up,” wrote one commenter.

“What happened??? STD???” asked a concerned local.

“I did still have a little hope for this weird giant sparkly dick,” wrote another. “But it’s slowly looking worse and worse.”

A backlash against the sculpture has begun. Picture: Supplied

A backlash against the sculpture has begun. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

“Just need a giant condom to cover it up now,” added a fourth.

However, the sculpture is actually not yet complete and the artist behind it says it will eventually open up to spread bird icons out to create a silhouette — which, it’s claimed, will resemble the shape of the Byron Lighthouse.

Upon commissioning the sculpture, Byron Shire Council’s Chair of the Council’s Public Art Panel, Councillor Sarah Ndiaye, said she was excited that the council had decided to invest in it.

“This is a significant project that reflects some of the creativity, history and natural beauty of this area.” she said, according to Byron Shire news.

“The budget for this installation represents Council’s biggest investment in public art, a key deliverable in Council’s Public Art Strategy.”

However, hundreds are clearly not impressed as a backlash mounts against the artwork.

A petition entitled, “Take down the sculpture that looks like you know what …” is gaining ground with more than 1700 signatures.

“I feel terrible for the person or persons who made the giant new sculpture, but it is an eyesore, and looks a little too close to being a males private organ rather than a lighthouse. Even it it’s not quite finished,” the petition creator Jamie Green wrote.

Artist impressions show the artwork in a different light. Picture: Supplied

Artist impressions show the artwork in a different light. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

“Byron has been built on its humbleness and a 12 metre-high sculpture on the drive in completely changes the way we represent our town.”

He claims the drive into Byron Bay used to be one of its “iconic features” — because of the “green rolling hills, the little blue shack with all the second hand surfboards and hitchhikers scattered along the way”.

“This has slowly being changing and it’s been getting less and less green, I am all for growth and things shifting, but could this artwork not have been an opportunity to honour the history of the town and represent the communities values?

“This tall shiny metal object feels like it belongs in Surfers Paradise rather (than) blocking the view of the 117 year old light house.”

It comes after Gold Coast residents also kicked off about a .1 million taxpayer funded roadside artwork “monstrosity”.

The City of Gold Coast said its “gateway” luminous yellow poles would “bookend” the city and become an iconic “welcome” to visitors and “welcome home” for residents ahead of the Commonwealth Games.

What you pay for … Picture: Supplied

What you pay for … Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied

What you actually get. Picture: Reddit

What you actually get. Picture: RedditSource:Supplied

The two artworks — one to the city’s north along the Pacific Highway and the other in the south near the airport on the Gold Coast Highway — were supposed to spell out “Gold Coast” and “GC”.

However, the eye-wateringly expensive signs — in particular the one to the city’s north — did not impress local ratepayers.

They said the only way you can read it is by standing stationary and directly in front of it — meaning it just looks like a yellow mess of poles and lights as you drive by.

Even the council’s mayor said the Pacific Highway artwork is an “eyesore” and a “waste of money”.

And, as one phallic Aussie icon is “erected” in Byron Bay, another is coming down in Newcastle.

What goes up, must come down. Picture: Alamy

What goes up, must come down. Picture: AlamySource:Alamy

Last year, it was announced that the city’s phallus-shaped Queen’s Wharf Tower, named by some as “the big penis”, would be demolished this year due to a maintenance bill of .6 million and lack of disabled access.

Mark Zuckerberg has drawn protests over privacy and data protection in the US. Picture: Saul Loeb/AFP

Our Facebook logins are selling for just .90 on the dark web

STOLEN Facebook login details are being fleeced on the dark web for just .90, sparking fresh privacy fears after the website was hit by a huge cyber attack last week that reached even Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg.

Ads offering Facebook customers’ account details for sale can be easily found on the dark web — a hard-to-access corner of the internet used by criminals to buy drugs, stolen personal details and fake documents.

A report by UK firm Money Guru found that online identities are often stolen and sold to companies who engage in targeted advertising.

“There are few better ways to gain insight into someone’s life than their social media accounts,” the report found.

“These details are frequently stolen to sell to companies with little scruples about targeted advertising.

“It’s also a fast track to identity theft as they can take control of your accounts, lock you out and cause serious reputational damage in a short space of time.”

After purchasing your login details, a criminal could access your social media accounts and find out private information such as when a user is away on holiday, where their children go to school and even their bank details if these have been shared in messages.

It can take just 10 minutes for a fraudster with the right software to access dark web sites that claim to sell the log-in details, an investigation found.

Money Guru’s James MacDonald said the findings clearly demonstrated “how vital it is to protect your data where possible to avoid facing costly consequences”.

Facebook users have been unhappy with the company’s approach to hacks lately.

Facebook users have been unhappy with the company’s approach to hacks lately.Source:Getty Images

LATEST ATTACK

The shocking report comes as Facebook is in the grips of a major identity theft crisis in which criminals exploited a bug giving them access to 50 million user accounts.

The latest attack hasn’t just impacted the social network, but many other sites as well.

On Friday evening, Facebook revealed that hackers had gained access to 50 million accounts.

This let them use your Facebook account “as if they were the account holder” — a shocking security gaffe.

A problem in Facebook’s code allowed outsiders to steal access tokens, the digital keys that keep people logged in to Facebook. Picture: Jeff Chiu/AP

A problem in Facebook’s code allowed outsiders to steal access tokens, the digital keys that keep people logged in to Facebook. Picture: Jeff Chiu/APSource:AP

But because of the way the hack worked, it also gave attackers the same level of access to any additional social media accounts you use Facebook to log in with.

So if you tied your Facebook to Messenger, Instagram, Spotify, Tinder or Airbnb, the hackers will have been able to slip into those accounts too, accessing your profile information, photos, private messages and more.

Hack timeline: How did we get here and when did it all happen?

Hack timeline: How did we get here and when did it all happen?Source:Supplied

It’s all thanks to a major screw-up in Facebook’s website code.

When you log in to websites like Facebook, you are given an access token.

Access codes are like digital keys that remind the website, and other linked services, that you’re logged in.

That’s why when you close the Facebook tab and open it up again later, you’re still logged in.

But last June, Facebook added a new video upload tool which introduced a major bug.

The bug allowed hackers to generate access tokens for absolutely anyone on the website.

Unsurprisingly, hackers used this bug to create access tokens for 50 million users across the site.

If you used Facebook to log in to any other social media accounts like Instagram, those platforms could be at risk too. Picture: Carl Court

If you used Facebook to log in to any other social media accounts like Instagram, those platforms could be at risk too. Picture: Carl CourtSource:Getty Images

Importantly, if you log in to other services with Facebook, this access token would treat you as being logged in to those services too.

So it didn’t matter how strong your password was, or whether two-factor authentication meant you need to receive a text or email code to log in.

The hack allowed attackers to convince these websites that they were already logged in — accessing your account under the radar.

Hackers were also given complete access (as if they were you, effectively), and so could have accessed any part of your accounts.

The only way to actually avoid being caught up in this hack was to (1) not have a Facebook account, or (2) get lucky, and not be targeted by the hackers.

“Because this issue impacted access tokens, it’s worth highlighting that these are the equivalent of a username and password combination but are used by applications to authenticate against other applications,” Synopsys senior technical analyst Tim Mackey said.

“If you’ve ever used a Facebook login button on a website, now would be an excellent time for Facebook users to review their app settings to see which applications and games they’ve granted access rights to within Facebook.”

How did the Facebook breach happen?

How did the Facebook breach happen?Source:Supplied

WHAT IT MEANS

The big fear is that hackers will have used automatic tools to harvest information from all 50 million accounts that were compromised.

This means it’s possible hackers are currently sitting on photos, videos and private messages for tens of millions of people around the world.

This data pool grows significantly when you add services like Tinder or Instagram into the mix.

And even if you weren’t hacked yourself, messages you sent to people who were hacked may still be compromised.

This significantly increases the risk of identity fraud, blackmail — even lost relationships.

If you’ve ever sent racy photos, made mean comments or moaned about an employer on your Facebook — or in private messages — hackers may be ready and waiting to release this information right now.

Or if you’ve ever given out personal details such as your address and phone number, for example, in a private message when selling items on Facebook Marketplace, that information may be in the hackers’ hands.

Facebook has said hackers exploited its ‘View As’ feature, which lets people see what profiles look like to someone else. The company has taken steps to fix the security problem and alerted police. Picture: Marcio Jose Sanchez

Facebook has said hackers exploited its ‘View As’ feature, which lets people see what profiles look like to someone else. The company has taken steps to fix the security problem and alerted police. Picture: Marcio Jose SanchezSource:AP

Hackers could also use the information they stole to defraud you, potentially gaining access to your bank accounts or other important services.

“Today, consumers should be working under the assumption that their private information has been stolen by hackers ten times over,” Sam Curry, chief security officer at Cybereason, said.

“Today, consumers are reminded again to watch their identities and credit for abuse.

“As an industry until we can start making cyber crime unprofitable for adversaries, they will continue to hold the cards that will yield potentially massive payouts.”

Mark Zuckerberg has drawn protests over privacy and data protection in the US. Picture: Saul Loeb/AFP

Mark Zuckerberg has drawn protests over privacy and data protection in the US. Picture: Saul Loeb/AFPSource:AFP

If you were hacked, you’ll have been logged out and received a notification.

To guard your information in the future, follow our guide here.

And it might disappoint you to find out Facebook faces a maximum fine of just .25 billion — less than 3 per cent of billionaire CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s net worth.

A Spotify spokesman told The Sun that although Facebook’s systems allowed access to Spotify accounts, Spotify’s own systems weren’t directly breached.

“Spotify has not experienced a security breach,” he said.

“However we recognise that many users repurpose login information across various platforms. As a precaution, anyone with concerns can update their Spotify password, or contact customer service who can assist.”

US-SCIENCE-SPACE-SPACE X

High there: Reaction to Elon Musk smoking pot is snarky, blunt

US-SCIENCE-SPACE-SPACE X

It was the single puff felt ’round the world.

Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk took one puff of a marijuana cigarette Thursday on comedian Joe Rogan’s podcast, the Joe Rogan Experience. The podcast was two and a half hours long, but social media quickly focused on the brief second of smoking. Recreational marijuana is legal in DC and nine US states, including California, where the podcast was recorded, but is still illegal at the federal level.

Musk didn’t exactly go full Spicoli with his lone puff, saying ‘I don’t actually notice any effect,’ and ‘I don’t find that it is very good for productivity.’ It’s not clear if the toke played any role in Tesla stock taking a hit Friday after both the company’s chief accounting officer, Dave Morton, and its head of human resources, Gabrielle Toledano, announced they’re leaving the electric carmaker.

Many people on social media found comic value in a billionaire CEO pulling a Big Lebowski.

Some saw Musk’s smoke break as a way to make a more serious point.

The Musk story took another turn later on Friday, when Charles Gasparino of Fox Business Network reported that a source said the US Air Force was looking into Musk’s brief smoke. 

SpaceX is a government contractor and marijuana use is prohibited for people with government security clearance,’ Gasparino tweeted. An Air Force source also confirmed the news to CNBC, though Reuters said an Air Force representative had called the reports inaccurate.

Some thought the Air Force’s involvement was going too far, but others disagreed.

And at least one Twitter user suggested President Trump’s proposed future branch of the military might have something to say about this, tweeting, ‘Just wait until the Space Force comes after him.’